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Te Tari Moromoroiti me te Ārai Mate

Latest news & events


Summer Studentship Report Success

Posted by on 23 May 2013 | Comments

Congratulations to Alex Morrison, whose Summer Studentship Report 'Mapping sites of colonization of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in experimentally infected Johne's deer' received a Highly Commended Award by the Otago School of Medical Sciences Dean's Advisory Committee.

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Dean's Bequest Fund - Departmental Success

Posted by on 22 May 2013 | Comments

Congratulations to Assoc Prof Alex McLellan and Dr Matloob Husain, who have both been granted funding from the Otago School of Medical Sciences Dean's Bequest Fund.

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Todd Foundation Award for Excellence (University) success

Posted by on 6 May 2013 | Comments

Congratulations to Elyse Dunn, who received a Todd Foundation Award for Excellence (University), which will allow her to travel to Cambridge University to conduct research in Dr Judy Hirst's Lab in the Mitochondrial Biology Unit.  Elyse is a PhD student in Greg Cook's Lab.

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OMSRS Summer Student Presentation success

Posted by on 3 May 2013 | Comments

Congratulations to Elliott Dunn, who was runner up at the OMSRS Summer Student Presentation Evening, held on May 1.  The evening showcased a great series of student talks.  Elliott is a MSc student in  Dr Ros Kemp’s lab,  and presented his work: ‘Long-term in vitro expansion of human intestinal organoids’ which was performed in the lab of Assoc Prof Grant Butt.

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Best Summer Scholarship Report

Posted by on 1 May 2013 | Comments

Congratulations to Dayle Keown, for winning a prize for the best summer scholarship report. Dayle’s project, conducted in Dr Joanna Kirman’s lab, was part of the multidisciplinary Whiti Te Ra study, which aims to understand the causes of early childhood respiratory infection in New Zealand. Dayle's project was to investigate whether the presence of rhinovirus correlated with respiratory disease severity.  Unlike similar studies conducted on infants overseas, Dayle did not find that the presence of human rhinovirus in nasal swab samples was associated with disease severity.  Interestingly, the number of human rhinovirus positive samples was twice as high as those detected in a similar study population in the US.  The aim is to publish these findings, along with the investigations on other viruses present in the samples, later this year.

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